the book, social security and magic

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It’s been high excitement over here for a couple of days. The book is approaching the finish line and there have been head shots, cover art and websites. And, there’s been social media – Facebook has been like a birthday, only better.

In the middle of all of this, I got a phone call. “It’s the Social Security Administration. May I please speak to John Torrey?”

Deep breath, “I’m sorry, John doesn’t speak. This is his mother, Jesse.”

“Mrs. Torrey, John is over 18. I need to speak with him.”

Count to ten, “Sure. I can put him on the phone. You might get a smile out of him, but I can assure you that he will not speak to you.”

I could hear the shuffle of papers in the background, “Okay, sorry. John got approved for benefits. Can you come in tomorrow morning to finish the paperwork?”

My mind raced thinking of all the things I had planned, but I found myself saying, “How early should we arrive to make this as painless as possible?”

That’s our reality. We have priorities that can’t be put on the back burner.

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So, this morning Jack and I left early enough to be there before the Social Security Administration office opened. Determined to get in and out quickly enough so that Jack didn’t miss too much school and I didn’t miss my very important hair appointment. Unfortunately, we were far from the first in line, so we sat. And sat. Jack and I were busy taking selfies and making each other laugh, when I noticed the couple behind us admiring him. Jack has a way of making friends wherever we go. The man offered Jack some gum, which Jack grabbed without a thought and popped into his mouth (yes – Jack takes candy from strangers and I let him). We started talking to the couple and before too long they shared that their son had Down Syndrome and that they felt so blessed that he is not just doing well, but is happy, “Just like your son.”

We talked and talked – enjoying our visit so much, that I was almost disappointed when we got called to meet with our representitive. We exchanged goodbyes and off we went. As Jack and I sat waiting for the paperwork to be done, our new friends stopped by to say goodbye. The man reach into his pocket and handed Jack his pack of gum, “This is for you Jack. Enjoy!”

Jack gave him a high five and I thanked our new friends and wished them well. Then, as he walked away, the man turned around and said, “Oh, and Jack – take your mom out to lunch.”

I looked down at the gum in Jack’s hands and there was a twenty dollar bill stuck in the pack.

Our lives are complicated, but sometimes I feel like magic follows us around.

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We made it home in time for Jack to go to school for a couple of hours and for my hair to get back to being sassy. Now I have the task of reading the book one last time before it gets printed. As I travel back to the early days of Jack’s diagnosis, I am trying to remind myself of all the magic in our lives and just how lucky we are.

Check out my  “author page” – this is really happening!

Love, Jess

PS  We made a donation to CaringBride today. We love to “pay things forward” and without CaringBridge there would be no book.