Medication or Menace? (the answer for us is clear)

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Another week, another article – this time in the Columbian (The Columbia High School Newspaper – our district supports the Torreys)!

When I was approached by a student at Columbia High School to be interviewed for an article about medical marijuana, I did pause to make sure my family was on board. I have shared it here before, but The Columbian is a different audience. Anna is a junior at Columbia and I didn’t want her to feel uncomfortable with me sharing our story with her classmates. She had two comments, “You share EVERYTHING with EVERYONE – I’m used to it. And, why would I care about people knowing Jack uses medical marijuana? It’s medicine.”

As always – Anna’s right. I do share a lot. I share to help me process what’s going on in our lives. I share to help other special families see that life does not need to be defined by disabilities. I share so “non-special” (is that a thing?) families can see that us special folks aren’t really that different. AND I share to spread the word about what works and what doesn’t.

Medical Marijuana has worked for Jack. It helps him focus and relax and eat Cheetos while watching bad TV – I’m kidding about that last one. That’s one of the problems – marijuana/mary jane/pot/weed/ganga/herb/cannabis – whatever you call it, it has a bad reputation. Many people categorize marijuana as simply a recreational drug and discount all of it’s medical benefits. People have their image of “refer madness” and have trouble wrapping their brains around the fact that it is a far superior and less dangerous drug than many medications that live in most medicine cabinets.

I expected some judgement from older generations about using marijuana for medicinal reasons, but I was startled to see that even high school kids seem to have a hard time excepting medical marijuana as a real medication. 54% of Columbia High School students interviewed for this article did not think it should be allowed to to treat illness on school grounds. I find that shocking. I do hope this article helps to educate and open people’s mind to new alternatives for treating people with nerve pain, spasticity, MS, cancer, seizures, glaucoma, etc.

Clearly it’s time for marjiana to find a good public relations team. Jack would be happy to be a spokesperson.

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Love, Jess (Pot Mama)

 

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