THIS is ALD #18 — Margaret

If you haven’t read THIS is ALD #17, go back. It’s an incredible piece showing how ALD can weave itself through a family for generations. It was shared by an ALD mother/daughter/grand-daughter/great-granddaughter. She is also a symptomatic carrier. THIS is her story.

 

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THIS is ALD #18 — Margaret

I first started noticing little things, symptoms, in my 20s. The first thing I distinctly remember is the feeling that ants were crawling on my lower legs. Then I had back spasms; I’d be sitting at work and my back would knot up. I attributed it to having to sit a lot at work. But then I started visiting a chiropractor who did massages and we couldn’t figure out why or how my neck muscles used to get so tight in between appointments. I then started to visit a massage therapist, leapfrogging between the chiropractor—and my neck and shoulder muscles were still really tight, like all the time. I thought it was stress, not just at work, but my personal life was crumbling around me. I felt like a pinball, bounding from one circumstance to another for a year. I wasn’t taking care of myself, I was always fatigued, and my migraines started getting bad again.

I started having problems wearing shoes with heels in my early 30s. Now, I can only wear flats that go all around my feet (no flip flops). My feet are always numb but surprisingly sensitive. My hands are often numb too—I put them down so the blood flow is restored and I can feel again. I have little grip strength. I also have Raynaud’s Syndrome, wherein the capillaries in my fingers and toes shut when cold, so they get white and numb. I don’t know if it’s an AMN thing or a family thing.

I’ve had to get a cane to walk with so that I don’t look like I’m a drunk meandering along the walkway. I got a shower seat so I don’t fall in the bathtub. I have orthotics that go down my lower legs and into my shoes the length of my feet so that my toes don’t slip on the ground. I have an implanted drug infusion pump that puts baclofen (a medication that helps relieve spasticity) directly into my spinal column.

I have pain every day, it feels like my bone marrow is boiling. I visit my pain doctor every month. I have taken every medicine there is. I take 9 medications every day, besides the baclofen, and have another 4 I take as needed. Fatigue is a huge issue for me, both as a result of medicine side effects and exhaustion from dealing with pain.

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I’ve been on Social Security Disability for 10 years — a combination of AMN, Migraine, and anxiety and depression. It took two tries over almost three years to get approved. I’ve had to be reassessed twice and will again. There’s nothing like watching your abilities slip away, knowing that this shell of a body will fail me, I just don’t know when, or what my quality of life is going to be in the meantime. I don’t mean to end on a negative note, it’s just that that’s what I’ve been dealing with internally the past few months.

— Margaret

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As I’ve gotten more involved with the ALD community, one question that keeps coming to mind has been, What about the carriers (women with the gene)? There are some differing opinions on the subject, but more and more the answer is that people don’t carry ALD, they have ALD. Even women.

I won’t go too much into the science behind X-linked diseases like ALD (frankly I don’t know too much about them), but here’s a short version. In the case of an X-linked disease the mutation affects a gene on the X chromosome. Males, having only one X chromosome, are effected by the condition if the single X they inherit from their mother has the mutation (or the mutation happens spontaneously). This is why ALD is generally passed from mother to son. Females have two X chromosomes and the unaffected X chromosome should HELP their body compensate for the gene mutation. It is a common misconception that females cannot have X-linked disorders and that they can only be unaffected carriers — In truth, diseases like ALD are proving that while females tend to be better off than males (because one of their chromosomes is producing the correct protein), they can, and often do, have the disease in varying severities.

I have heard that there are cases of full-blown cerebral ALD in girls, but I can’t verify that. But, I have met several women over the last year that are clearly effected by our disease. Neuropathy, bladder dysfunction, spasticity and balance issues seem to be quite common for women with the ALD mutation, especially as they get older. Unfortunately Margaret falls into the category of “symptomatic carrier”.

Thank you Margaret for your honesty. It’s important for people to see every way ALD can effect a person. It’s also important for people to understand that ALD can effect every person with the mutation. Again – newborn screening identifies people — both genders –with the gene so that they can be monitored and treated properly.

Love, Jess

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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